Betty’s Week

    Mom was scheduled for a medical procedure Thursday morning, so after completing my day Wednesday I headed for Panola County to spend the night with her. Traveling the Pope/Water Valley Road late in the afternoon is treacherous, with all the critters on the move. I saw a couple of deer that had not made it, and then several that I managed to avoid.
     In addition to these  I had to brake for coons, squirrels, a fox, turtles, a coyote (I think) and a couple of snakes, that I would have liked to have killed. On a cool evening, at twilight, the critters are on the move.
  Finally made it to mom’s and found my supper waiting. Jimmie was there and she’d cooked for Bill and her and brought me a plate. Mom’s only intake for the night was water or juice to swallow her pills—she wasn’t real found of this diet, as she likes to eat on a regular basis.
  We finally finished the prep and Jimmie went home. I slept in the den in order to guard the kitchen, if you could call that night’s rest sleep. Three very noisy trains went through (at 2, 3 and 4 a.m.), then Brother Bo goes to work at 5 and he has the loudest vehicle in the state—I’ve warned him that I’m drawing his name for the family Christmas tree and he’s getting a new muffler for his truck.
    He just grinned and said, “It takes two.”  
  Well, two it is.
   Added to all this the dogs in the neighborhood barked all night and when one would bark they’d wake up Little Bit and he would join the chorus.
  Needless to say, I was awake when Mom came through on her way to the kitchen to make her breakfast.
  “Whoa,” I says, “where do you think you’re going?”
 “To make my coffee and toast, I’m straving,” came her snippy reply.
  Had to tell her that food was not in her morning routine Thursday. All you get is a sip of water with the one pill you’re allowed this morning.     
    “Well, I guess I’ll just starve,” she sassed back, sat down in her easy chair and turned on the morning news.   
  Then she decided to just go back to bed. Had to nix this and It did not improve her happy camper status. Got her dressed, Jimmie arrived and we were off for outpatient surgery at BMH in Oxford.
  Mom forgave us, perked up, and we had a very pleasant day. She talked to all the attendants and they all said she was an excellent patient. She loves her doctor, Dr. Threadgill, and he reported that she did great. After we were summoned to recovery and he came by, telling us that all was well. He and Mom had a great conversation, with Mom asking about his grandmother, whom she had known in her girlhood days. When Dr. Threadgill started to leave, Mom asks, “When will I need to see you again?”
  His answer was, “In about 15 years!”
  Mom’s reply was, “I’ll be there Doc!”
  Now for you who don’t know, Mom celebrated her 93rd birthday August 8th.
  He turned to Jimmie and me and with a smile, says, “With her spirit, she probably will.”
  With her good news, she was ready to go home and set about convincing everyone she was fine and ready to depart. The nurse came in, turned off the IVs, took off the electrodes, and said she could get dressed and go. Mom was immediately up and says, “Hand me my clothes.” We did and in short order we were on our way home. She did consent to ride in the wheelchair to the car. I suspect though, that this was only because it was faster.
  I stayed with her Thursday night and we had a very comfortable night. Only one train and it was early in the evening and Bo didn’t have to go to work Friday morning. Even the dogs slept all night.
  I had a nine o’clock appointment with Dr. Perry, so Jimmie and I had to get up a little early. I also got a great report, seems the bone graft is doing fine.
  After seeing the doctor, we took in the big J. C. Penney sale. Found so many bargains that we decided to start our Christmas shopping. With two big arm loads, the clerk said, “Does this finish you Christmas shopping?” We admitted that it was only the beginning. However, we are way ahead of the game—we usually don’t start until the week before the big day. On the news that night I learned that we still have 50 days.
  Friday night, trains returned, dogs woke up, and the wind played the windchimes. I finally got up at five. Jimmie and I were going back to Penney’s for the early morning bargains and had planned to leave before six. We did good—filled up the car and were back at home before nine.
  Found Mom up, fed, and feeling fine. I cleaned a bit, cooked lunch, and then cooked my part of Sunday lunch. Made dressing, sweet potato casserole, lima beans and apple pie. Jimmie baked chicken, Bo cooked corn and Rance supplied peas and bread. The apples were so pretty (Granny Smiths) that I took the peeling and made jelly—it was great. We used to do this all the time, back when we picked the apples off the trees, canned or dried them. I’d forgotten just how good jelly is made from the peels. Growing up on the farm, you didn’t waste anything. We have become a wasteful society—maybe if we returned to our upbringing habits, our landfills would not be so congested, we’d probably eat better, and we might even have some surplus cash. Time would be a little more scarce.
  Jim tried in vain Thursday, Friday and Saturday to ascertain the status of all his ailing family. We were all at Mom’s and he had for some reason transposed her number, calling 9700 instead of 7900. When he finally reached Jimmie Saturday night, he reported that he’d found a new, to him, Batesville restaurant, but they were not willing to deliver to Las Cruces. Says he does not know why all of a sudden he forgets Mam-Maw’s number—he’s been using 7900 most of his life and he calls often.
  Came home late Saturday, unfortunately not in time to get to  Music in the Park, and I sure did hate missing this. Know it was great.
  Football season came to an end Friday night and I didn’t make a single game. Did hear a couple on the radio. I’m sorry the team did not make the playoffs, but this was a rebuilding year and I know they’ll be a great team next year.

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  We finally made it to Standard Time Sunday morning, and it didn’t do me a bit of good. I woke up at my usual six o’clock, only the clock read five. I still have not adjusted, but I am getting lots of chores done with these early morning risings.

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  Today’s General Election day. I hope everyone gets out and exercises their right to a say in who’s going to govern during the next four years. If you don’t vote, you can’t complain. I’ve decided on most of my choices, and will nail down the rest before I stop by the polling place on my way home. Then I’ll sit up and see how well I did—hope the new voting machines make it an early to bed night.

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  Traveling over the weekend I enjoyed the pretty colors. Glad I got to see them, because with the predicted 30 tonight, it may be the only fall foliage I see.

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  As I set the obit of long-time friend, Brownie Crawford, a few minutes ago, I was remembering the many things he has contributed to the Valley. Of course he was an excellent businessman, but I think my best memories are of his keen wit—loved him as “Stringbean” on the old “Hee Haw” shows, and also all the hilarious pranks that I’ve heard about through the years. I never saw him without a smile and a twinkle in his eye. He will be missed and sympathy is extended to Dorris, the children, grands, and all the family.

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